Friday, March 30, 2018

Friday | Whale and dolphin wacthing


Today was another windy and wavy day, making the perfect playground for the dolphins. We encountered bottlenose dolphins and common dolphins enjoying these waves in the morning, as well as a fin whale close to Ponta Delgada. The whale was calm and possibly even sleeping, as it was not traveling much, submerged close to the surface and only breathing occasionally. In the afternoon we returned to the sea to encounter the playful common dolphins. We also saw fin whales just right before we entered the Ponta Delgada harbor.

Photos by Miranda van der Linde



Bottlenose dolphin


Common dolphin



Common dolphins


Common dolphins


Fin whale


Fin whale blow


Fin whale blow


Fin whale blow


Our catamaran 4 Ventos


Our zodiac boat

Learn more about Risso's Dolphins and their marks



How we cataloged Risso’s dolphins in Azores and why they have mark types more than other specie 

Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griséus)

The Risso’s dolphin (Grampus griseus) is a resident species in the Azores. They can measure up to 4 meters in length and weigh over 500 kg. 

In this species the length of females tends to be roughly the same as males, contrary to the majority dolphin species in which males are larger than females.

 This species normally occurs in oceanic waters (400 m 1000 m depth) and in temperate and tropical areas. They have a blunt head without a defined snout, which is an evolutionary morphological adaptation that facilitates their predation on squids and small cephalopods.
















They have the peculiarity of being born with a dark colouration and acquiring marks throughout their lifetime, thus becoming white with age.














These marks can be caused by suction cups that squids have on their tentacles and by other Risso’s dolphins, since they can sometimes be more aggressive while socializing.



The photo ID is a technique used to identify individuals through a photo of their dorsal fin that can changes as the animal ages, acquiring marks and cuts. Since each dorsal fin is different then it works as a fingerprint and allows to create a individuals catalog.








In Futurismo’s catalog are cataloged 570 individuals and 1100 photos taken since 2010. Here some examples of some individuals who have many differences over the years:










Unfortunately this species suffers greatly in terms of captivity, mostly in Asia. In Japan hundreds of dolphins are caught every year. Those with better morphological conditions are trained for entertainment shows and the rest are killed. Do not contribute to these captive centers, it is much better to see the animals in their natural habitat. Do not buy a ticket!



Written by Rafael Martins 


Thursday, March 29, 2018

Thrusday | Whale and dolphin Watching


Today we had fin whales again. In the morning they were feeding and surfacing frequently so that they were easy to watch. We also encountered bottlenose dolphins and common dolphins during the morning. In the afternoon the wind had picked up so this time the whales were difficult and only let us see their blows. But the dolphins and Cory's Shearwaters alike both enjoyed the wind and waves like for surfing and gliding, using the conditions to their advantage.


Photos by David Rodrigues 


Fin whale blow 


Fin Whale







Whale and dolphin watching 








Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Wednesday | Fin whales bottlenose and common dolphins

Today was a combination of sunny and breezy out on the ocean. We enjoyed this beautiful day in the company of migratory fin whales and our resident bottlenose dolphins and common dolphins. We feel lucky to have fun whale present for all our tours during the past week.
Photos by David Rodrigues & Mariana Silva
Fin whale
Fin whale
Common dolphin
Fin whale
Bottlenose dolphin

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Tuesday | Whale and dolphin watching

What a wonderful day! We saw two sunfish and it was amazing, we catched the moment!
Today we had a really sunny day and the sea was like a mirror. 
Few moments after we left the port, we saw a big group of Common dolphins, more than 100 individuals, some of them calfs. Then we also saw two Fin whales and Risso’s dolphins!


Photos by @Mariana Silva e @David Rodrigues




Sunfish


Fin whale


Fin whale


Sunfish


Rissos dolphin


Rissos dolphin


Fin whale


Fin whale watching


Fin whale watching


Big group of common dolphin


Common dolphins


Common dolphins


Common dolphins


Common dolphin


Baby Common dolphin 




Monday | Fin whales, bottlenose and common dophins

We started well this week! Today in the two tours we saw more two Fin whales. The mother and a juvenile. We also encountered Bottlenose and Common dolphins.
Photos by Miranda van der Linde



Fin whale


Bottlenose dolphins


 Bottlenose dolphins



Fin whale
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